The Hayling Site
Go Back   Hayling Forum > Island Stuff > History & Heritage

Welcome to The Hayling Site

Thanks for stopping by the forum of The Hayling Site. Our forum is the place where locals, ex-islanders and others with an interest in Hayling Island come to chat, keep up with local issues and vent.
You are very welcome to view the website as a guest. You can also register for free if you wish. As a registered user you can also:

  •  » Join in the conversation in the forum
  •  » Submit your news and events
  •  » Enjoy the website with fewer adverts
  •  » Access member only areas and content

Click Here to register for free.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 16-04-2012, 08:20 AM   #11
Ann
Prized Member
 
Ann has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Queensberry Lodge

St Mary's graveyard plan

359.ILMO William TURBERVILLE 14.10.1912 - 4.9.1996 and his w. Gladys Kathleen 24.11.1910

It looks as if the Rev. Charles Hardy, vicar of St Mary's, was Anne Brooksbank's brother-in-law, which is probably why she came to live at Hayling.

571.Charles HARDY 48 years Vicar of Hayling North and South d. 9th July 1885 aged 81 also Charlotte his wid. d. 29th May 1894 aged 77
Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2012, 09:16 AM   #12
Ann
Prized Member
 
Ann has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Queensberry Lodge

Rev. Charles Hardy, Vicar of Hayling, was married to Charlotte, 3rd daughter of Rev. Joseph William Martin, Rector of Keston, by Rev. James Kirkpatrick, in January 1845
Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16-04-2012, 05:04 PM   #13
Ann
Prized Member
 
Ann has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond reputeAnn has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Queensberry Lodge

1871 census

Queensberry Lodge has an agricultural labourer as head of house, plus wife. The adjacent properties on the census are Westfield Stables and the Live and Let Live Beerhouse!

It may be that it was Anne Brooksbank who made QL it into a proper house and that before that it was a humble lodge or gardener's cotttage on the Westfield estate.
Ann is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28-04-2012, 07:48 PM   #14
Holdens
Junior Member
 
Holdens is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Queensberry Lodge

Thanks for all your research Ann. Thinking about it more, it would make sense that the house was originally a gardeners cottage, likely for Westfield House, given it was behind this estate, and had the front added on to make it into a "lodge". I'm still intrigued to find out more about this early cottage, as i haven't been able to place it on earlier maps so I'd like to find out when it was built. This part of the house certainly seems a lot older than the front part which as you say was probably added somewhere around 1870; the walls are thick and not straight, and the limestone flags in the old kitchen are very worn where the old entrance used to be. The front part of the house also a cellar. From the earliest maps it looks like there was a orchard behind the house, which makes sense as the old garden wall can still be seen down Garden Close; now with 3 bungalows in it.

The garage, which is separate, was clearly a stable for two or possibly four horses, as you can still see the dividing brickwork between the stalls. The floor is old polished brick.

Next door, Rhue Cottage, is in the process of being semi-knocked down and rebuilt. I went round to have a look and could see what was probably an entrance to the old cellars, but it's all filled in. I gather there was a skittle alley there too, but I think this may have been to the East of that property and now underneath the next-door house.
Holdens is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30-04-2012, 08:36 PM   #15
badger
Prized Member
 
badger's Avatar
 
badger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond reputebadger has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Queensberry Lodge

Quote:
Originally Posted by Holdens View Post
... Next door, Rhue Cottage, is in the process of being semi-knocked down and rebuilt. I went round to have a look and could see what was probably an entrance to the old cellars, but it's all filled in. I gather there was a skittle alley there too, but I think this may have been to the East of that property and now underneath the next-door house.
For some reason my interest was aroused by thought of the old pub which was next door to Queensbury Lodge (if it were still there now, it would be my local!) - and I found myself tracking the progress of the two sites as seen on the maps from 1879 to 1969 on http://www.old-maps.co.uk/maps.html to which Ann pointed us.

Here's what I found - I hope some of it interests you and may be new to you:

Comparing the 1879 and 1898 1:2500 maps, Queensbury Lodge was extended eastward between those times; a structure of some sort between QL and the former Live and Let Live (now Rhue Cottage) was removed; the Queensbury Lodge plot frontage was extended westward; and two structures were built (probably the stables you've mentioned) north-east of QL up to the northern boundary of the plot. The skittle alley footprint on the eastern side of the Live and Let Live is evident on both maps.

The 1909 map shows an addition (the conservatory?) to the westward side of the front part of Queensbury Lodge, and what looks like a porch added to the front of the former Live and Let Live. (And, hp, Stonehenge was built nearby!)

No significant changes to the ground plans on those plots by the 1932 map.

The 1938-42 and 1962-63 1:10,560 maps reveal no change (Rhue Cottage reportedly suffered bomb damage in 1941).

The 1969-70 1:2,500 map reveals no change to Queensbury Lodge. Garden Close has been built. The footprint of the skittle alley is no longer shown protruding north-north-east from the back of Rhue Cottage, which has acquired a building to its western side (maybe a garage?). Rhue's plot appears to have extended westward towards Queensbury Lodge to take over a track which led to the field north of it. While Rhue has acquired a very close neighbour (No. 19) next to its eastern boundary, this boundary does not appear to have changed (so I
would expect any remains of the skittle alley, if it wasn't totally obliterated in post-bomb reconstruction, to lie under the eastern end of the building).
.

Last edited by badger; 30-04-2012 at 08:38 PM.
badger is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:16 AM.